Archive for September, 2011

How to Get Tax Credits for Roof Replacement

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

“The Internal Revenue Service allows homeowners to apply for a tax credit after making energy-efficient home improvements. Roof replacement, in some cases, can enhance the energy efficiency of a home and may qualify for a tax credit,” explained Steve Keirstead, co-owner of RemodelPros.com parent company West Coast Vinyl, Inc.

Roof replacement must be completed on the homeowner’s primary residence with materials that meet IRS requirements for energy-efficient homes. Those materials include metal roofs with specially pigmented coatings designed to reflect sunlight and asphalt roofs that contain cooling granules.

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/9/prweb8833932.htm

Sunny Days for Solar

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

This week, solar electricity made the news with high-profile investments by Google and the government’s energy department.

Google announced that they are funding the installation of solar panels on 10,000 homes. The Obama administration’s investment will loan out about a billion dollars to electric companies developing their solar programs.

When looking for the best places for solar, sun is one part of the equation.

http://www.accuweather.com/blogs/news/story/55680/sunny-days-solar-google-obama.asp

Should You Go Solar?

Sunday, September 25th, 2011

There’s no doubt that a solar electric system will cut your monthly utility bill. But will it save you money in the long run? That’s a tricky question. The upfront costs average about $15,000 to $25,000 (after financial credits and rebates). For a lot of folks, the discussion ends right there. But for people who live in areas with lots of sun, high electricity rates and significant financial incentives, the payback period for a solar electric system can be less than five years. This article will pose five key questions to help you decide whether solar makes sense for you.

http://www.power-eng.com/news/2011/09/1504857883/should-you-go-solar.html

Japan’s Fukushima Disaster Creates Opportunity for Alternative Energy

Sunday, September 25th, 2011

As thousands of Japanese protest against the nuclear power industry in Tokyo, it may be time to consider investing in the alternative energy sector.

Thousands of Japanese citizens took to the streets on Monday in Tokyo, calling on the government to reduce the country’s use of nuclear power. The protests are the latest reaction to the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, which happened after much of northeast coastal Japan was devastated by an earthquake and tsunami earlier this year on March 11.

Former Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan recently revealed in an interview with Kyodo News that the situation looked so bleak shortly after nuclear disaster struck the Fukushima Number One nuclear power plant that 30 million residents of the Tokyo metropolitan area faced evacuation, according to the worst case scenario in a report he received in the early days of the unfolding nuclear crisis.

http://www.minyanville.com/businessmarkets/articles/nuclear-industry-fukushima-disaster-japan-nuclear/9/19/2011/id/36954

Ask Angie: Overlaying New Roof

Sunday, September 25th, 2011

We need a new roof. A builder suggested overlaying over the existing layer of shingles. Is it wise to do this? My concern is how would we know about any underlying damage? I would appreciate any input about the pros and cons of this method.

In general, it is not good practice to overlay a traditional asphalt shingle roof versus a complete tear off and replacement for the very reason you stated: you can’t examine the decking to determine if there is any damage that needs repaired. If you don’t take your roof down to the sheathing, you will never know if you have proper underlayment, or are experiencing sheathing rot, or ice or water damage.

That said, overlaying asphalt shingles with a metal roof could be an option, provided there is no underlying damage. Metal roofs offer energy savings but do cost more upfront than traditional asphalt shingles. They also last longer and stand up to foul weather better than shingles. No matter what type of roof you choose, make sure you tell your roofer to fix any underlying problems you have before installing any new roof.

http://www.bnd.com/2011/09/12/1856700/ask-angie-overlaying-new-roof.html