Archive for the ‘Metal Roofing’ Category

How to Get Tax Credits for Roof Replacement

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

“The Internal Revenue Service allows homeowners to apply for a tax credit after making energy-efficient home improvements. Roof replacement, in some cases, can enhance the energy efficiency of a home and may qualify for a tax credit,” explained Steve Keirstead, co-owner of RemodelPros.com parent company West Coast Vinyl, Inc.

Roof replacement must be completed on the homeowner’s primary residence with materials that meet IRS requirements for energy-efficient homes. Those materials include metal roofs with specially pigmented coatings designed to reflect sunlight and asphalt roofs that contain cooling granules.

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/9/prweb8833932.htm

Ask Angie: Overlaying New Roof

Sunday, September 25th, 2011

We need a new roof. A builder suggested overlaying over the existing layer of shingles. Is it wise to do this? My concern is how would we know about any underlying damage? I would appreciate any input about the pros and cons of this method.

In general, it is not good practice to overlay a traditional asphalt shingle roof versus a complete tear off and replacement for the very reason you stated: you can’t examine the decking to determine if there is any damage that needs repaired. If you don’t take your roof down to the sheathing, you will never know if you have proper underlayment, or are experiencing sheathing rot, or ice or water damage.

That said, overlaying asphalt shingles with a metal roof could be an option, provided there is no underlying damage. Metal roofs offer energy savings but do cost more upfront than traditional asphalt shingles. They also last longer and stand up to foul weather better than shingles. No matter what type of roof you choose, make sure you tell your roofer to fix any underlying problems you have before installing any new roof.

http://www.bnd.com/2011/09/12/1856700/ask-angie-overlaying-new-roof.html

Cool Metal Roofing – A Hot Idea

Friday, September 9th, 2011

Driven to reduce energy costs and make long-term improvements to their homes, more homeowners than ever are installing durable and environmentally friendly metal roofing systems. According to new statistics from McGraw-Hill Construction Research and Analytics®, the number of homes with metal roofs has more than tripled over the past decade, moving metal from 3% of the overall U.S. market to 10%.

Although metal may initially seem an unlikely choice for cooling, recent advances are allowing metal to shed its “cat on a hot tin roof” image. …

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/cool-metal-roofing-a-hot-idea-2011-09-01

Maintenance Will Prolong Life of a Roof

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

Roofs play a key role in protecting you and the interior of your home from outside weather conditions, primarily moisture. Roofs also provide protection from the sun. In fact, if designed correctly, roof overhangs can protect the building’s exterior walls from moisture and sun.

Most roofs last many years if properly installed and maintained. Maintenance includes cleaning the leaves and debris from the roof’s valleys and gutters. Debris in the valleys can cause water to wick under the shingles and cause damage to the interior of the roof.

Clogged rain gutters can cause water to flow back under the shingles on the eaves and cause damage, whatever the roofing material may be including composition shingle, wood shake, tile or metal. While seasonal changes in the weather are considered one of the most destructive forces, the best way to preserve your roof is make sure the attic is properly insulated, vented and to stay off it.

Concerns regarding moisture, standing water, durability and appearance are dependent on the type of roofing materials used …

http://www.lfpress.com/homes/2011/08/11/18540146.html

Metal Roofs Look Better than Ever

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

The term “metal roof” can conjure up images of dull, flimsy corrugated sheet metal rusting away on top of an old dilapidated house. But times – and metal roofs – are changing.

“Metal roofs have been around for years, but over the last few years they’ve really evolved,” says Angie Hicks, founder of the consumer group Angie’s List. “They come in different styles and colors – some look like wood, slate tile, clay tile, even asphalt shingles.”

http://www.abcactionnews.com/dpp/money/angies_list/metal-roofs-look-better-than-ever.-angie’s-list-details-the-many-advatages.